The State of My Being

This blog contains those things which move my spirit, peak my interest, speak to my heart, cause me to wonder, and remind me to breathe ~ shaping me to be

soulbrotherv2:

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 1: The Witnesses: A Novel by Sharon Ewell Foster

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 2: The Testimony: A Novel by Sharon Ewell Foster

Leading a small army of slaves, Nat Turner was a man born with a mission: to set the captives free. When words failed, he ignited an uprising that left over fifty whites dead. In the predawn hours of August 22, 1831, Nat Turner stormed into history with a Bible in one hand, brandishing a sword in the other. His rebellion shined a national spotlight on slavery and the state of Virginia and divided a nation’s trust. Turner himself became a lightning rod for abolitionists like Harriet Beecher Stowe and a terror and secret shame for slave owners. 

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 1: The Witnesses, Nat Turner’s story is revealed through the eyes and minds of slaves and masters, friends and foes. In their words is the truth of the mystery and conspiracy of Nat Turner’s life, death, and confession.  [book link]

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 2: The Testimony, relates the whole story—from Turner’s early slave years with his Ethiopian-born mother through the uprising, his trial, and hanging—from Nat’s perspective. It’s a story full of greed and betrayal, faith and courage, villains and heroes.  [bool link]

afrofuturistaffair:

cyborgmemoirs:

afrofuturistaffair:

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.
We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators
Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014
This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it). 
To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.
Name or Organization:
Contact info (email/phone):
Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:
Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:
If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.
Website (if available):
If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.
Photos of Past Charity Balls:
The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball
The Museum of Time
Dark Phase Space 

boost for the squad

Six days

afrofuturistaffair:

cyborgmemoirs:

afrofuturistaffair:

This year, The AfroFuturist Affair Annual Charity & Costume Ball has expanded space-time from one evening to a month-long celebration of Afrofuturism.  In addition to the 4th Annual Costume Ball on Saturday, November 8 2014, we will have events throughout November, including workshops, dance party, readings, book club, film screenings, art exhibit, and more. We are seeking self-identified AfroFuturists to perform or display their Black sci-fi, spec-fic, and Afrofuturistic themed work at the Ball. We are also seeking submissions for workshops and presentations.

We need: Authors, Poets, Inventors, Vocalists, Rappers, Visual artists, Performance artists, Filmmakers, Dancers, Designers, Musicians, Magicians, Producers, Metaphysicians, other creatives/creators

Deadline to submit: Sunday, October 5 2014

This month we will explore the theme of Black Holographic Memory, the collective unconscious memory of Black folk through all permutations of space-time. Like a hologram, each individual contains the whole of the collective memory - we must simply learn how to access it.  We appreciate afrofuturistic and speculative works that incorporate this theme or hints at ways to access the memory hologram (however you interpret it).

To share your ideas, talents, and proposed performances for inclusion in this year’s celebrations, please email afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com by October 5, 2014 with the below info, and “Charity Ball” in the subject line.

Name or Organization:

Contact info (email/phone):

Title of proposed performance/display/workshop:

Brief description of proposed performance/display/workshop:

If available, attach at least one image or video URL illustrating what you do. It can be a past example or a sketch of the proposed idea.

Website (if available):

If you are interested in sponsoring, vending, or volunteering, please submit an email to afrofuturistaffair@gmail.com. We are able to offer promotion and advertisement space to all sponsors. Vendors will be charged a low registration fee.

Photos of Past Charity Balls:

The AfroFuturist Affair Charity & Costume Ball

The Museum of Time

Dark Phase Space

boost for the squad

Six days

(via soulbrotherv2)

soulbrotherv2:

Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America by Tanner Colby
Almost fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, equality is the law of the land, but actual integration is still hard to find. Mammoth battles over forced busing, unfair housing practices, and affirmative action have hardly helped. The bleak fact is that black people and white people in the United States don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Tanner Colby, himself a child of a white-flight Southern suburb, set out to discover why.
Some of My Best Friends Are Black chronicles America’s troubling relationship with race through four interrelated stories: the transformation of a once-racist Birmingham school system; a Kansas City neighborhood’s fight against housing discrimination; the curious racial divide of the Madison Avenue ad world; and a Louisiana Catholic parish’s forty-year effort to build an integrated church. Writing with a reporter’s nose and a stylist’s flair, Colby uncovers the deep emotional fault lines set trembling by race and takes an unflinching look at an America still struggling to reach the mountaintop. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America by Tanner Colby

Almost fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, equality is the law of the land, but actual integration is still hard to find. Mammoth battles over forced busing, unfair housing practices, and affirmative action have hardly helped. The bleak fact is that black people and white people in the United States don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Tanner Colby, himself a child of a white-flight Southern suburb, set out to discover why.

Some of My Best Friends Are Black chronicles America’s troubling relationship with race through four interrelated stories: the transformation of a once-racist Birmingham school system; a Kansas City neighborhood’s fight against housing discrimination; the curious racial divide of the Madison Avenue ad world; and a Louisiana Catholic parish’s forty-year effort to build an integrated church. Writing with a reporter’s nose and a stylist’s flair, Colby uncovers the deep emotional fault lines set trembling by race and takes an unflinching look at an America still struggling to reach the mountaintop. [book link]

(via eternallybeautifullyblack)

eternallybeautifullyblack:

One-Third of the World’s Women in Prison Have One Striking Thing in Common
Zak Cheney
They’re locked up in the United States. All 201,200 of them.
As you can see, it’s not even close. Citing data from the International Center for Prison Studies, Niall McCarthy of Statistica visualizes how the United States housed nearly one-third of the globe’s incarcerated women in 2013.


It’s a huge problem the American public has only begun to recognize.


The context: Recently, discussions around the rise of mass incarceration have focused largely on men, most notably, black men. One in 10 black men is in prison on a given day, while they remain nearly six times as likely to be imprisoned in their lifetime than their white peers.
While those figures are staggering, they’re also part of a much larger story. Considering how its total prison population grew by 500% in the past 30 years, it might seem unsurprising that America locks up so many women compared with the rest of the world. But here’s the kicker: Growth in the number of female prisoners was nearly 1.5 times that of men for this period.
[Continue reading article at Identities.Mic.]

eternallybeautifullyblack:

One-Third of the World’s Women in Prison Have One Striking Thing in Common

Zak Cheney

They’re locked up in the United States. All 201,200 of them.

As you can see, it’s not even close. Citing data from the International Center for Prison Studies, Niall McCarthy of Statistica visualizes how the United States housed nearly one-third of the globe’s incarcerated women in 2013.

It’s a huge problem the American public has only begun to recognize.

The context: Recently, discussions around the rise of mass incarceration have focused largely on men, most notably, black menOne in 10 black men is in prison on a given day, while they remain nearly six times as likely to be imprisoned in their lifetime than their white peers.

While those figures are staggering, they’re also part of a much larger story. Considering how its total prison population grew by 500% in the past 30 years, it might seem unsurprising that America locks up so many women compared with the rest of the world. But here’s the kicker: Growth in the number of female prisoners was nearly 1.5 times that of men for this period.

[Continue reading article at Identities.Mic.]