The State of My Being

This blog contains those things which move my spirit, peak my interest, speak to my heart, cause me to wonder, and remind me to breathe ~ shaping me to be
halftheskymovement:

Widely seen as the mother of the global movement to end female genital mutilation (FGM), Efua Dorkenoo has been campaigning against the practice since the 1980s and was instrumental in getting the British government to change its policy towards it. Dorkenoo passed away a week after participating in the launch of The Girl Generation – a major Africa-led campaign to tackle FGM across the globe.“She was a giant on whose shoulders we stand, she prepared the way for us, and even though she did not see the end of FGM in her generation, it will end – and that is thanks to her,” says Nimko Ali, an FGM survivor and Co-founder of Daughters of Eve, a UK-based NGO working to end the practice.Read more via The Guardian.

halftheskymovement:

Widely seen as the mother of the global movement to end female genital mutilation (FGM), Efua Dorkenoo has been campaigning against the practice since the 1980s and was instrumental in getting the British government to change its policy towards it. Dorkenoo passed away a week after participating in the launch of The Girl Generation – a major Africa-led campaign to tackle FGM across the globe.

“She was a giant on whose shoulders we stand, she prepared the way for us, and even though she did not see the end of FGM in her generation, it will end – and that is thanks to her,” says Nimko Ali, an FGM survivor and Co-founder of Daughters of Eve, a UK-based NGO working to end the practice.

Read more via The Guardian.

say I won’t

—A response to the assertion that you can’t perform a certain task. African American Proverb (via blkproverbs)

pulitzercenter:

Tuberculosis is a disease of poverty. It is also the world’s second-deadliest infectious disease. But as Pulitzer Center grantees David Rochkind and Jens Erik Gould point out in Vietnam, “efforts to fight it are critically under-funded.”
"TB is largely an illness of the voiceless poor, which is part of the reason funding pales in comparison to a disease like HIV,” reports Jens in an Untold Story dispatch for the Pulitzer Center.

pulitzercenter:

Tuberculosis is a disease of poverty. It is also the world’s second-deadliest infectious disease. But as Pulitzer Center grantees David Rochkind and Jens Erik Gould point out in Vietnam, “efforts to fight it are critically under-funded.”

"TB is largely an illness of the voiceless poor, which is part of the reason funding pales in comparison to a disease like HIV,” reports Jens in an Untold Story dispatch for the Pulitzer Center.

girl please

—When someone says something irrational, exaggerated, or just plain dumb. African American Proverb (via )

(Source: blkproverbs)

soulbrotherv2:

No More!: Stories and Songs of Slave Resistance by Doreen Rappaport  and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 
A man who cannot swim leaps off a slave ship into the dark water. A girl defies the law by secretly learning to read and write. A future abolitionist regains his will to live by fighting off his captor with his bare hands: “I will not let you use me like a brute any longer,” Frederick Douglass vows. Drawing from authentic accounts, here is a chronology of resistance in all its forms: comical trickster tales about outwitting “Old Marsa”; secret “hush harbors” where Africans instill Christian worship with their own rituals; and spirituals such as “Go Down Moses,” whose coded lyrics signal not just hope for deliverance, but an active call to escape. 
Boldly illustrated with extraordinary oil paintings by award-winning artist Shane W. Evans, and meticulously researched by Doreen Rappaport, this stunning collection - spanning the period from the early days of slavery to the Emancipation Proclamation - is an invaluable resource for teachers, parents, libraries, students, and people everywhere who care about what it means to be free, what it is to be human.
[book link]

soulbrotherv2:

No More!: Stories and Songs of Slave Resistance by Doreen Rappaport  and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 

A man who cannot swim leaps off a slave ship into the dark water. A girl defies the law by secretly learning to read and write. A future abolitionist regains his will to live by fighting off his captor with his bare hands: “I will not let you use me like a brute any longer,” Frederick Douglass vows. Drawing from authentic accounts, here is a chronology of resistance in all its forms: comical trickster tales about outwitting “Old Marsa”; secret “hush harbors” where Africans instill Christian worship with their own rituals; and spirituals such as “Go Down Moses,” whose coded lyrics signal not just hope for deliverance, but an active call to escape. 

Boldly illustrated with extraordinary oil paintings by award-winning artist Shane W. Evans, and meticulously researched by Doreen Rappaport, this stunning collection - spanning the period from the early days of slavery to the Emancipation Proclamation - is an invaluable resource for teachers, parents, libraries, students, and people everywhere who care about what it means to be free, what it is to be human.

[book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Flip Wilson Show - The Church Of What’s Happening Now

Sometimes Flip had a segment called “The Church Of What’s Happening Now”. 

Just what will the collection plate bring in this episode?

(via soulbrotherv2)

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Sweets: Soul Food Desserts and Memories by Patty Pinner and photographed by Sheri Giblin
Growing up in a large African-American family in a small town in Michigan, Patty Pinner spent her childhood helping the women of the house-the Queens of Soul Food-whip up the sweet treats that crowned family dinners, neighborhood gatherings, and church socials. In SWEETS, Patty shares her family’s stories, maxims, and magical desserts, many named after family members like Cud’n Daisy, Aunt Sug, and My My, her beloved grandmother. Part recipe book, part family history, this sweet-as-can-be cookbook is a heartfelt tribute to women who ruled the home and the kitchen with their wisdom, hearts, and cooking.
[book link]

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Sweets: Soul Food Desserts and Memories by Patty Pinner and photographed by Sheri Giblin

Growing up in a large African-American family in a small town in Michigan, Patty Pinner spent her childhood helping the women of the house-the Queens of Soul Food-whip up the sweet treats that crowned family dinners, neighborhood gatherings, and church socials. In SWEETS, Patty shares her family’s stories, maxims, and magical desserts, many named after family members like Cud’n Daisy, Aunt Sug, and My My, her beloved grandmother. Part recipe book, part family history, this sweet-as-can-be cookbook is a heartfelt tribute to women who ruled the home and the kitchen with their wisdom, hearts, and cooking.

[book link]

(via soulbrotherv2)

soulbrotherv2:

Caught this story, One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’, on NPR’s Fresh Air yesterday.  I immediately pre-ordered the book.  Looking forward to reading this one.
Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson
Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.
Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.
[book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Caught this story, One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’, on NPR’s Fresh Air yesterday.  I immediately pre-ordered the book.  Looking forward to reading this one.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.

[book link]